An Ancient Roman Convert to Judaism Who Became a “Mother of the Synagogues”

April 22 2019

In the first centuries of the Common Era, many Roman Jews buried their dead in elaborate catacombs, many of which can still be seen today. One sarcophagus bears the name of Beturia Paulina, whom the inscription—from the 1st century CE—describes as having converted to Judaism sixteen years prior to her death at age eighty-six. Carly Silver writes:

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Read more at Bible History Daily

More about: ancient Judaism, Archaeology, Conversion

Israel’s Critics Only Care about Law and Rights when It Suits Them to

While the legal case of landowners trying to evict delinquent tenants from property in Jerusalem may have little to do with the hundreds of rockets that Hamas and its allies launched into Israel in the past few days, or the mob violence in Israeli cities, it has frequently been cited as a proximate cause. The affair (explained here and here), concerns Jews who lost their property when Jordan cleansed the neighborhood of Jews in 1948, to whom it was returned through normal legal procedures after 1967. Elliott Abrams compares this case to those of works of art stolen from European Jews by the Nazis—which have similarly been returned to their owners through ordinary litigation:

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Read more at National Review

More about: Holocaust restitution, Israeli law, Israeli-Palestinian Conflict