The 18th-Century Italian Jewish Doctor Who Treated Christians During a Pandemic and Won the Approval of a Future Pope

July 12 2021

In the 17th century, the University of Padua was the only European university that admitted non-Catholics, leading many Jews to flock to its medical school. One such student was Rabbi Samson Morpurgo. Edward Reichman recounts Morpurgo’s career, and shares some visually striking documents:

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Read more at Seforim

More about: Catholic Church, Italian Jewry, Jewish-Catholic relations, Medicine

Why a Government Victory in Southwestern Syria Is Bad News for Israel

Sept. 17 2021

Last week, Russia negotiated a ceasefire between the Syrian government and rebel forces in the city of Daraa, where the initial protests that sparked the uprising against Bashar al-Assad began. The agreement ended a 75-day assault on the city, located near the country’s southwestern border, by Russian, Iranian, and Syrian forces. Jonathan Spyer explains the significance of these events:

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Read more at Jonathan Spyer

More about: Golan Heights, Iran, Israeli Security, Russia, Syrian civil war