The Lutheran Church Turns against Israel

Aug. 26 2016

Nearly 500 years ago, Martin Luther called for the burning of synagogues and the destruction of Jewish homes. In 1994, the leaders of the American Lutheran church, along with the global organization, formally rejected and condemned the anti-Semitism of their denominations’ founder. Now, however, the church’s current leaders are seeking to reverse that decision. The triennial assembly of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America (ELCA), the official U.S. Lutheran organization, recently voted in favor of resolutions calling for divestment from Israel and for the U.S. government to end aid to the Jewish state, recognize a Palestinian state, and pressure Jerusalem to stop the building of “settlements.” Petra Heldt explains how the anti-Israel movement hijacked the church:

Both resolutions, de facto, intend the destruction of the state of Israel. The anti-Israel character of the resolutions fits the old-style Lutheran anti-Semitic diatribes. . . .

The strategy was simple: Isaiah 58 [a U.S.-based anti-Israel Lutheran group] and the network of the current head of the Lutheran World Federation (Munib Younan, [a Palestinian]) teamed up for the preparations of the anti-Israel resolutions. The organized lobbying work [at the conference] produced the desired results. To make sure that no mishap occurred, . . . Pastor Khader Khalila from Bethlehem addressed the ELCA assembly on the alleged Israeli occupation of Bethlehem (which of course has been controlled by the Palestinian Authority since 1993). It worked like clockwork. There was no recognizable group of Lutheran Christians that was able to defend its own turf against such anti-Semitic usurpers. . . .

While politicians might be able to afford to ignore old-fashioned and outdated resolutions on Israel and continue with their business as usual, the good leadership of the Lutheran churches worldwide should not.

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More about: Anti-Semitism, Israel & Zionism, Jewish-Christian relations, Martin Luther

 

Terror Returns to Israel

Nov. 28 2022

On Wednesday, a double bombing in Jerusalem left two dead, and many others injured—an attack the likes of which has not been seen since 2016. In a Jenin hospital, meanwhile, armed Palestinians removed an Israeli who had been injured in a car accident, reportedly murdering him in the process, and held his body hostage for two days. All this comes as a year that has seen numerous stabbings, shootings, and other terrorist attacks is drawing to a close. Yaakov Lappin comments:

Unlike the individual or small groups of terrorists who, acting on radical ideology and incitement to violence, picked up a gun, a knife, or embarked on a car-ramming attack, this time a better organized terrorist cell detonated two bombs—apparently by remote control—at bus stops in the capital. Police and the Shin Bet have exhausted their immediate physical searches, and the hunt for the perpetrators will now move to the intelligence front.

It is too soon to know who, or which organization, conducted the attack, but it is possible to note that in recent years, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) has taken a lead in remote-control-bombing terrorism. Last week, a car bomb that likely contained explosives detonated by remote control was discovered by the Israel Defense Forces in Samaria, after it caught fire prematurely. In August 2019, a PFLP cell detonated a remote-control bomb in Dolev, seventeen miles northwest of Jerusalem, killing a seventeen-year-old Israeli girl and seriously wounding her father and brother. Members of that terror cell were later arrested.

With the Palestinian Authority (PA) losing its grip in parts of Samaria to armed terror gangs, and the image of the PA at an all-time low among Palestinians, in no small part due to corruption, nepotism, and its violation of human rights . . . the current situation does not look promising.

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Read more at JNS

More about: Israeli Security, Jerusalem, Palestinian terror