The United Nations and the Press Snap into Action to Condemn Israel

Aug. 11 2022

During and after the IDF’s brief surgical campaign against Palestinian Islamic Jihad (PIJ) in the Gaza Strip, “the usual suspects”—as Richard Kemp terms them—rushed to express their dissatisfaction with the Jewish state. The condemnations began with the initial strike that killed Tayseer al-Jabari, the terrorist group’s senior figure in Gaza. Kemp writes:

UN Special Coordinator for the Middle East Peace Process Tor Wennesland was “deeply concerned” by “the targeted killing today of a Palestinian Islamic Jihad leader inside Gaza.” . . . Wennesland’s “deep concern” was aggravated by comments from Francesca Albanese, UN special rapporteur on the “Occupied Palestinian Territories,” who managed in one tweet both to condemn Israel and contort its actions into a darkly malign parody of reality—so far, so UN. [Without evidence], she claimed that Israel’s actions were to “deter Islamic Jihad’s possible retaliation for its leader’s arrest,” going on to describe the strikes as “flagrant aggression” in breach of international law.

This is pure fiction. Israel has not claimed its operation in Gaza—codenamed Breaking Dawn—is to deter. The government has made it clear that the strikes were to prevent an imminent threat to the Israeli population. It had hard intelligence that PIJ, led by Jabari, was planning attacks across the border from Gaza. Protecting its people from violent external attack is not only permitted under international law, it is the duty of every government. If deterrence of such attacks were possible, Israel would have taken action to deter.

Jabari’s illegal attacks were to be in retaliation for the IDF’s arrest of Bassam al-Saadi in Jenin last week. Saadi is the leader of PIJ in Judea and Samaria, and since May last year he has been consolidating his terrorist bases there, bringing together an assortment of other terror gangs including Hamas, the Fatah-linked al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigade, and the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine.

This left PIJ’s city strongholds, mainly in the north, largely ungovernable by the Palestinian Authority, with their Kalashnikovs calling the shots and PA security forces afraid to enter. The deteriorating situation contributed much to the wave of terrorist attacks against Israelis that [left] nineteen dead in March and April this year.

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Read more at Gatestone

More about: Gaza Strip, Israeli Security, Laws of war, United Nations

 

How the Death of Mahsa Amini Changed Iran—and Its Western Apologists

Sept. 28 2022

On September 16, a twenty-two-year-old named Mahsa Amini was arrested by the Iranian morality police for improperly wearing a hijab. Her death in custody three days later, evidently after being severely beaten, sparked waves of intense protests throughout the country. Since then, the Iranian authorities have killed dozens more in trying to quell the unrest. Nervana Mahmoud comments on how Amini’s death has been felt inside and outside of the Islamic Republic:

[I]n Western countries, the glamorizing of the hijab has been going on for decades. Even Playboy magazine published an article about the first “hijabi” news anchor in American TV history. Meanwhile, questioning the hijab’s authenticity and enforcement has been framed as “Islamophobia.” . . . But the death of Mahsa Amini has changed everything.

Commentators who downplayed the impact of enforced hijab have changed their tune. [Last week], CNN’s Christiane Amanpour declined an interview with the Iranian president Ebrahim Raisi, and the Biden administration imposed sanctions on Iran’s notorious morality police and senior officials for the violence carried out against protesters and for the death of Mahsa Amini.

The visual impact of the scenes in Iran has extended to the Arab world too. Arabic media outlets have felt the winds of change. The death of Mahsa Amini and the resulting protests in Iran are now top headlines, with Arab audiences watching daily as Iranian women from all age groups remove their hijabs and challenge the regime policy.

Iranian women are making history. They are teaching the world—including the Muslim world—about the glaring difference between opting to wear the hijab and being forced to wear it, whether by law or due to social pressure and mental bullying. Finally, non-hijabi women are not afraid to defy, proudly, their Islamist oppressors.

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Read more at Nervana

More about: Arab World, Iran, Women in Islam