Britain’s Labor Party Leader Apologizes for the Corbyn Years

In October 2020, Jeremy Corbyn—under whose prior leadership the British Labor party had become a cesspool of anti-Semitism—was suspended from the party altogether after saying that anti-Semitism among its members was “dramatically overstated.” His successor, Keir Starmer, has since tried to rectify the situation, and has made multiple overtures to the Jewish community. In an interview, Jake Wallis Simmons challenged Starmer about his longstanding fealty to Corbyn as well as his plans to make Labor more welcoming to Jews.

Would Prime Minister Sir Keir Starmer be, as they say, “good for the Jews”? Since the Corbyn years, this has become an inevitable question. And it is possible to argue that he would.

Sir Keir and his Jewish wife, Victoria, are members of St. John’s Wood Liberal Synagogue and are bringing their children up with a sense of Jewish identity. He has repeatedly vowed to tear out anti-Semitism “by the roots.” When we met on Monday in a comically cramped cloakroom in a nursery in Harrow, he made a point of mentioning that he had extended family in Israel.

Yet for much of the community, the jury remains firmly out on the former head of the Crown Prosecution Service. A recent poll has suggested that 65 percent of Jews still find Labor unwelcoming, as the shadow of Corbynism continues to darken local branches. It darkens parts of the opposition benches in Parliament as well. It’s hard to forget that Sir Keir was one of Jeremy Corbyn’s longest-serving shadow-cabinet members, clocking up 1,559 days under his leadership. In July 2019, he said he had “full confidence” in Mr. Corbyn as—believe it or not—the right man to root out Jew-hatred in the party.

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Read more at Jewish Chronicle

More about: British Jewry, Jeremy Corbyn, Labor Party (UK), United Kingdom

 

The Attempted Murder of Salman Rushdie Should Render the New Iran Deal Dead in the Water

Aug. 15 2022

On Friday, the Indian-born, Anglo-American novelist Salman Rushdie was repeatedly stabbed and severely wounded while giving a public lecture in western New York. Reports have since emerged—although as yet unverified—that the would-be assassin had been in contact with agents of Iran, whose supreme leaders have repeatedly called on Muslims to murder Rushdie. Meanwhile U.S. and European diplomats are trying to restore the 2015 nuclear agreement with Tehran. Stephen Daisley comments:

Salman Rushdie’s would-be assassin might have been a lone wolf. He might have had no contact with military or intelligence figures. He might never even have set foot in Tehran. But be in no doubt: he acted, in effect, as an agent of the Islamic Republic of Iran. Under the terms of the fatwa issued by Ayatollah Khomeini in February 1989, Rushdie “and all those involved in [his novel The Satanic Verses’s] publication who were aware of its content, are sentenced to death.” Khomeini urged “brave Muslims to kill them quickly wherever they find them so that no one ever again would dare to insult the sanctities of Muslims,” adding: “anyone killed while trying to execute Rushdie would, God willing, be a martyr.”

An American citizen has been the victim of an attempted assassination on American soil by, it appears, another American after decades of the Iranian supreme leader agitating for his murder. No country that is serious about its national security, to say nothing of its national self-worth, can pretend this is some everyday stabbing with no broader political implications.

Those implications relate not only to the attack on Rushdie. . . . In July, a man armed with an AK-47 was arrested outside the Brooklyn home of Masih Alinejad, an Iranian dissident who was also the intended target of an abduction plot last year orchestrated by an Iranian intelligence agent. The cumulative weight of these outrages should render the new Iran deal dead in the water.

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Read more at Spectator

More about: Freedom of Speech, Iran, U.S. Foreign policy