How the "Protocols" Emboldened a Notorious Far-Right Russian Party

In the early 1900s, the Protocols encouraged Russia’s largest and most influential monarchist party to adopt an even more extreme form of anti-Semitism.



Russians belonging to a far-right party marching during the 1905 revolution. Wikipedia.
Russians belonging to a far-right party marching during the 1905 revolution. Wikipedia.
Response
Dec. 18 2017
About the author

Abraham Ascher is Distinguished Professor of History Emeritus at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and the author of, among other books, The Revolution of 1905, Russia: A Short History, and Was Hitler a Riddle?


Walter Laqueur’s thesis, stated in the first sentence of his incisive essay in Mosaic, is both disturbing and indisputable: “Turbulent times tend to produce turbulent voices.” As Laqueur also points out, such voices can lead to horrendous behavior on the part of ruthless politicians and their followers. As a prime example, he cites the case of Hitler’s Germany, where the Protocols of the Elders of Zion was distributed in millions of copies and where Jews were systematically subjected to unprecedented humiliation and violence. What is more, he writes, even in democracies like the United States, public figures in diverse walks of life have gained substantial followings by adopting the slogans of the most extreme anti-Semites.

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

More about: Anti-Semitism, History & Ideas, Protocols of the Elders of Zion, Russia