It's Not So Easy to Distinguish Attitudes toward the Jewish State from Attitudes toward Jews

As in the past, so today, anti-Semitism shows itself to be a virus almost infinitely protean.

A huge Arabic banner reading “Today the Israeli pig will desecrate the al-Aqsa mosque” during a 2005 demonstration in Cairo. AFP/Getty Images.

A huge Arabic banner reading “Today the Israeli pig will desecrate the al-Aqsa mosque” during a 2005 demonstration in Cairo. AFP/Getty Images.

Response
Dec. 26 2017
About the author

Joshua Muravchik is the author most recently of Heaven on Earth: The Rise, Fall, and Afterlife of Socialism (Encounter).


Walter Laqueur’s illuminating essay on the Protocols of the Elders of Zion reminds us that, while Jewish life has changed greatly in the last centuries, demonization of Jews remains a constant. Jews no longer live in compact and isolated communities as was typical during the post-exilic era, and in the democratic West the majority of their members have abandoned the regulations and rituals that once distinguished them from their neighbors. Many have even left behind their belief in the one God whose revelation at Sinai was the cardinal source and principle of their contribution to human history and development. And yet the Jewish people continues to be feared, envied, and despised.

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

More about: Anti-Semitism, History & Ideas, Protocols of the Elders of Zion