How Anti-Discrimination Became a Religion, and What It Means for Judaism

Currently, Jews are among the most popular religious groups in the U.S. As the liberal left’s commitment to religious liberty fades, how long will this consensus last?

Anti-Religious Freedom Restoration Act demonstrators in Indianapolis in 2015. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images.

Anti-Religious Freedom Restoration Act demonstrators in Indianapolis in 2015. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images.

David E. Bernstein
Response
Aug. 8 2016
About the author

David E. Bernstein is GMU Foundation professor at the Antonin Scalia Law  School, George Mason University. He blogs for the Volokh Conspiracy at the Washington Post.

Richard Samuelson’s essay, “Who’s Afraid of Religious Liberty?,” offers a sobering look at how religious liberty has come to be devalued by American liberals, especially when it conflicts with the liberal attachment to anti-discrimination law. Progressives see adherence to many traditional religious teachings, particular those concerning sexual morality and the status of women, as mere bigotry to be stamped out by government authorities.

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More about: Politics & Current Affairs, Religious liberty, RFRA