The Jewish Question and the Quarrel between Religion and Reason

June 15 2016

Although he was an advocate of religious toleration, the French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire, like his counterparts in Germany, fervently opposed religion altogether in the name of reason. He was thus no friend of the Jews, believing that their “impertinent fables,” which were at permanent odds with reason, might one day make them “deadly to the human race.” Tracing the history of Enlightenment attitudes toward the Jews through the lens of attitudes toward religion, Gertrude Himmelfarb explains why, by contrast, Jews have fared so well in America:

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Read more at Weekly Standard

More about: Alexis de Tocqueville, American founding, Anti-Semitism, Enlightenment, History & Ideas, Religion, Voltaire

 

Hamas and Hizballah Won’t Give Up Their Radical Goals for Economic Benefits

June 18 2021

In his first interview after leaving office, the former head of the Mossad, Yossi Cohen, admitted that he had erred in believing that Israel could come to some sort of accord with Hamas. In his own words:

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Read more at JNS

More about: Gaza Strip, Hamas, Hizballah, Iran, Mossad