The Little-Known Tale of the Jews Who Tunneled Out of a Ghetto to Fight against the Nazis

July 28 2022

On September 26, 1943—three days before Rosh Hashanah—a group of 232 Jews used a tunnel they had built themselves to sneak out of a Nazi ghetto to the comparative safety of the nearby forests. The escape from the Polish town of Nowogródek (known as Navaredok in Yiddish and currently in Belarus) was organized by the Bielski brothers, a team of Jewish partisan leaders whose exploits were made famous by the film Defiance. Yehuda Geberer tells this remarkable story, and places it in the context of other Jewish rescue efforts during the Holocaust. (Audio, 43 minutes.)

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Read more at Jewish History Soundbites

More about: East European Jewry, Holocaust, Holocaust rescue, Resistance

Terror Returns to Israel

Nov. 28 2022

On Wednesday, a double bombing in Jerusalem left two dead, and many others injured—an attack the likes of which has not been seen since 2016. In a Jenin hospital, meanwhile, armed Palestinians removed an Israeli who had been injured in a car accident, reportedly murdering him in the process, and held his body hostage for two days. All this comes as a year that has seen numerous stabbings, shootings, and other terrorist attacks is drawing to a close. Yaakov Lappin comments:

Unlike the individual or small groups of terrorists who, acting on radical ideology and incitement to violence, picked up a gun, a knife, or embarked on a car-ramming attack, this time a better organized terrorist cell detonated two bombs—apparently by remote control—at bus stops in the capital. Police and the Shin Bet have exhausted their immediate physical searches, and the hunt for the perpetrators will now move to the intelligence front.

It is too soon to know who, or which organization, conducted the attack, but it is possible to note that in recent years, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) has taken a lead in remote-control-bombing terrorism. Last week, a car bomb that likely contained explosives detonated by remote control was discovered by the Israel Defense Forces in Samaria, after it caught fire prematurely. In August 2019, a PFLP cell detonated a remote-control bomb in Dolev, seventeen miles northwest of Jerusalem, killing a seventeen-year-old Israeli girl and seriously wounding her father and brother. Members of that terror cell were later arrested.

With the Palestinian Authority (PA) losing its grip in parts of Samaria to armed terror gangs, and the image of the PA at an all-time low among Palestinians, in no small part due to corruption, nepotism, and its violation of human rights . . . the current situation does not look promising.

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Read more at JNS

More about: Israeli Security, Jerusalem, Palestinian terror