In France, Jewish Blood Is Cheap

In Paris on April 4, 2017, Kobili Traoré broke into the apartment of a neighbor, a retired Jewish physician named Sarah Halimi, and proceeded to beat her viciously while shouting anti-Semitic slurs. He then threw her out the window, and to her death, with a shout of “Allahu Akbar!” On Wednesday, a French high court upheld a previous decision that Traoré could not be held accountable for Halimi’s murder because he was under the influence of marijuana. Bari Weiss comments:

The rule of thumb, as the British writer and comedian David Baddiel has noted in his new book [of that name], is that Jews don’t count. But there is a more sophisticated version of this bloody arithmetic. When a Jew is harassed by a neo-Nazi, he counts. When a Jew is harassed by a person from another minority group, not so much. When a secular Jew is attacked, he counts. But when a Jew with a black hat is attacked, that’s ignored. If the story suits the narrative, it counts. If it undermines it, it doesn’t.

And so it is the case with the four-year saga of Sarah Halimi. . . . As Francis Szpiner, one of the Halimi family’s lawyers, asked of the court’s strange logic: “Will this also apply to drunk drivers who kill children on the road?” The question answers itself. The madness here does not belong to Traoré. It belongs to France.

[A] survey conducted by the American Jewish Committee last year found that 70 percent of French Jews say they have been victims of at least one anti-Semitic incident in their lifetime. . . . The French Jewish community, which is the largest Jewish community in all of Europe, has seen which way the wind is blowing for a while now. French Jews are heading for the exits, mostly to Israel.

Previous reports on the predicament of French Jewry can be read here, here, and here.

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Read more at Common Sense

More about: Anti-Semitism, French Jewry

 

As Vladimir Putin Sidles Up to the Mullahs, the Threat to the U.S. and Israel Grows

On Tuesday, Russia launched an Iranian surveillance satellite into space, which the Islamic Republic will undoubtedly use to increase the precision of its military operations against its enemies. The launch is one of many indications that the longstanding alliance between Moscow and Tehran has been growing stronger and deeper since the Kremlin’s escalation in Ukraine in February. Nicholas Carl, Kitaneh Fitzpatrick, and Katherine Lawlor write:

Presidents Vladimir Putin and Ebrahim Raisi have spoken at least four times since the invasion began—more than either individual has engaged most other world leaders. Putin visited Tehran in July 2022, marking his first foreign travel outside the territory of the former Soviet Union since the war began. These interactions reflect a deepening and potentially more balanced relationship wherein Russia is no longer the dominant party. This partnership will likely challenge U.S. and allied interests in Europe, the Middle East, and around the globe.

Tehran has traditionally sought to purchase military technologies from Moscow rather than the inverse. The Kremlin fielding Iranian drones in Ukraine will showcase these platforms to other potential international buyers, further benefitting Iran. Furthermore, Russia has previously tried to limit Iranian influence in Syria but is now enabling its expansion.

Deepening Russo-Iranian ties will almost certainly threaten U.S. and allied interests in Europe, the Middle East, and around the globe. Iranian material support to Russia may help the Kremlin achieve some of its military objectives in Ukraine and eastern Europe. Russian support of Iran’s nascent military space program and air force could improve Iranian targeting and increase the threat it poses to the U.S. and its partners in the Middle East. Growing Iranian control and influence in Syria will enable the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps [to use its forces in that country] to threaten U.S. military bases in the Middle East and our regional partners, such as Israel and Turkey, more effectively. Finally, Moscow and Tehran will likely leverage their deepening economic ties to mitigate U.S. sanctions.

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Read more at Critical Threats

More about: Iran, Israeli Security, Russia, U.S. Security, Vladimir Putin