Philo of Alexandria Sought to Combine Greek Thought with Sacred Scripture

April 16 2021

Born in the Egyptian city of Alexandria, at the time home to the largest Jewish community in the Roman empire, Philo Judaeus (ca. 20 BCE-50 CE) was the first person to write a book about Jewish theology. Apparently holding him in high regard, Alexandrian Jews chose him to be part of a delegation to Emperor Caligula in 37 CE after a pogrom in that city. Gregory Sterling analyzes the central ideas of his work and its legacy:

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Read more at Marginalia

More about: Ancient Egypt, ancient Judaism, Jewish Thought, Judaism, Philo, Philosophy

The Current Negotiations Won’t Stop Iran from Getting Nuclear Weapons

While the Biden White House is committed to restoring the 2015 agreement to restrain the Islamic Republic’s nuclear program, Tehran’s behavior since the deal was concluded should be sufficient to demonstrate that it had no intention of keeping to its terms, argues Elliott Abrams:

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Read more at Pressure Points

More about: Iran, Iran nuclear program, Joseph Biden, U.S. Foreign policy