The Peace Process Is Defunct—but Israel Mustn't Appear to Be Giving Up on It

Israel’s allies won’t support an out-and-out renunciation of the two-state solution.

Benjamin Netanyahu, Hillary Clinton, and Mahmoud Abbas in Egypt in 2010. AP Photo/Alex Brandon, Pool.

Benjamin Netanyahu, Hillary Clinton, and Mahmoud Abbas in Egypt in 2010. AP Photo/Alex Brandon, Pool.

Response
Sept. 8 2015
About the author

Elliott Abrams is a senior fellow for Middle Eastern studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, where he maintains a blog, Pressure Points.


Like Tinkerbell in Peter Pan, the “peace process” may die unless we all clap loudly and say we believe in it. In “The Two-State Solution Is in Stalemate,” Evelyn Gordon tells us to keep our hands down and embrace that terrible danger. In fact, she argues, we’d all be better off acknowledging that, whatever the fate of Tinkerbell, the “peace process” is already defunct.

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More about: Israel & Zionism, Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, Peace Process, Politics & Current Affairs