For the Sake of Any Future Dialogue, Israeli and Diaspora Jews Need First to Define Who They Are

What does each one stand for, and what are its baseline responsibilities toward the other?

Israel Defense Force cadets being sworn in at the Western Wall. Dominika Zarzycka/NurPhoto via Getty Images.

Israel Defense Force cadets being sworn in at the Western Wall. Dominika Zarzycka/NurPhoto via Getty Images.

Response
July 23 2018
About the author

Michael Oren, a member of the Knesset for the Kulanu party and deputy minister in the office of Israel’s prime minister, is the author of, among other books, Six Days of War: June 1967 and the Making of the Modern Middle East and Power, Faith, and Fantasy: America in the Middle East 1776 to the Present.


Natan Sharansky and Gil Troy have presented a compelling overview of the relations between Israel and diaspora Jewry—and, especially, between Israeli and American Jews: their strengths, their weaknesses, their stumbling blocks. The authors’ analysis of the deepening gap between the world’s two largest Jewish communities is singularly accurate, insightful, and thought-provoking. Their vision of a Jewish People’s Council gathering representatives from Israel and Jewish populations abroad is, if not new, timelier than ever.

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More about: Israel & Zionism