While Her Brother Worked to Obtain Britain’s Support for Zionism, Fanny Weizmann Spied for Germany

July 18 2019

During World War I, Chaim Weizmann and his associates sought to align the Zionist movement with the Western allies—a policy that brought enormous success in the form of the Balfour Declaration. But many Jews found Britain and France, allied as they were with viciously anti-Semitic Russia, unworthy of sympathy. So it is perhaps unsurprising that Weizmann’s own sister, Minna—who went by the name Fanny—agreed to spy for the Germans from, of all places, Palestine. Lenny Ben-David writes:

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Read more at inFocus

More about: Chaim Weizmann, World War I, Zionism

 

Like the Perpetrators of the 1994 Buenos Aires Bombing, Alberto Nisman’s Murderers Are Going Free

Jan. 20 2022

Seven years ago Tuesday, the Argentine Jewish lawyer Alberto Nisman—who was investigating the 1994 bombing of Buenos Aires’s AMIA Jewish center by Iranian agents—was shot under mysterious circumstances. As Toby Dershowitz explains, Nisman’s death was initially ruled a suicide, but the police, perhaps deliberately, contaminated the crime scene, and there is every reason to believe that Argentinian officials were responsible for his death:

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Read more at National Interest

More about: AMIA bombing, Argentina, Cristina Kirchner, Iran