Three and a Half Lessons of Jewish-Russian History

Even as we celebrate the great advances of post-Soviet Jewish communities, we need to remain vigilant.

The Grand Choral Synagogue in St. Petersburg, Russia. Alexander DemianchukTASS via Getty Images).

The Grand Choral Synagogue in St. Petersburg, Russia. Alexander DemianchukTASS via Getty Images).

Last Word
March 27 2017
About the author

Maxim D. Shrayer, born in Moscow in 1967, is a professor at Boston College and the author, most recently, of Leaving Russia: A Jewish Story, a National Jewish Book Award finalist. He is also the editor of Dinner with Stalin and Other Stories by his father, David Shrayer-Petrov, a Wallant Award finalist.


Iam deeply grateful to the editors of Mosaic for publishing my long essay on today’s Russian Jewry and the three responses to it.

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

More about: History & Ideas, Russia, Russian Jewry