Israel Shouldn't Draw Fixed Lines Between Itself and China

The Jewish state’s relationship with the U.S. is stronger for resting on an informal basis; replacing it with a formal alliance would do no good and only anger the world’s other major power.

Chemi Peres, Wang Qishan, vice president of China, and Benjamin Netanyahu in Tel Aviv on October 25, 2018. Tomer Neuberg/Flash90.

Chemi Peres, Wang Qishan, vice president of China, and Benjamin Netanyahu in Tel Aviv on October 25, 2018. Tomer Neuberg/Flash90.

Response
Dec. 9 2019
About the author

Eran Lerman is vice-president of the Jerusalem Institute for Strategic Studies and teaches Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at Shalem College.


Arthur Herman has once again made a major contribution to an ongoing debate over the future of the U.S.-Israel-China triangle. His latest essay in Mosaic, “The Impasse Obstructing U.S.-Israel Relations, and How to Remedy It,” is sobering, thought-provoking, and profound—and, ultimately, a hopeful take on the future of U.S.-Israel relations. It also reflects his cogent argument that the U.S. must now be as alert to the challenges ahead, and specifically the challenges posed by Chinese ambitions, as Israel has always been forced to be alert in its own hostile geostrategic environment.

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